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Man’s trial

What a wonderful blessing the eyes of man are. When he closes them, he can see nothing. His whole world is clothed in darkness. There is a world out there which he cannot see; objects that he cannot perceive.

Then, when he opens his eyes, an astonishing spectacle opens out before him. Black can be distinguished from white. What moves ap­pears to be moving, and what stands still is motionless in his sight. Animate and inanimate appear for what they are.

It is in this quality–the ability to distinguish between things–that man is unique. He is able to tell between right and wrong, and between light and darkness. He can see truth and falsehood for what they are. He is able to differentiate between what is proved by sound reason, and that which has no sound rational basis.

Truth appears before man in this world but he fails to see it. Its calls echo in his ears, but he is unable to hear it. It knocks on his door but he does not take it in.


Man’s uniqueness puts him in a critically testing position, for in his power of discretion God is putting him to the test. Man must show that he used his power of discretion to differentiate between right and wrong. A path of justice and one of oppression will open out before him. To succeed in his trial, he must follow the first and shun the second. He will be required to weigh up matters on the scales of sound reason. What is proved by clear signs he should accept; what has no clear proof in support of it, is to be rejected.

This task may appear easier than it really is. There is a price to be paid for success in the trial of life, and that price is the negation of the self. One can only discover universal truth by losing one’s sense of indi­vidual selfness. All too often, man is unable to pay this price, thus falling short of the required standard. The fruits of success in life’s trial elude him.

Truth appears before man in this world but he fails to see it. Its calls echo in his ears, but he is unable to hear it. It knocks on his door but he does not take it in. It is when truth appears before man, and he is able to accept it or reject it, that man is most required to make the right choice. But sadly he fails just where it is most crucial for him to succeed.

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