Spiritual warrior - by Brahma Kumaris

Spiritual warrior

"The spiritual warrior blames nobody, and takes full responsibility for the self and the battlefield he has found himself in." - Aruna Ladva
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Often the picture of a warrior conjures up images of a battered and wounded soldier, breathless and exasperated! But the image of a spiritual warrior is somewhat different! A spiritual warrior is always ready and prepared to meet any challenge with alacrity. He has no fear, just love and lightness.

Spiritual warrior is balanced—grounded and firm. He never tires because he never gets wounded. Unlike the other warriors, he smiles in the face of uncertainty and even calamity! The spiritual warrior walks with pride and confidence. Even before he begins, he knows victory is guaranteed. No task is too great or prodigious because he has cultivated such inner self-respect and a big open heart that is willing and generous.

He is never distracted or side tracked; lazy or careless. He cannot even indulge in vanity for the warrior knows that to lose focus for even a moment would allow the enemy to gain ground! Spiritual warriors are brave and courageous. They keep themselves protected with the shield or aura of God’s Divine light. Their feet hardly touch the ground and their “artillery” is always on hand.

The weapons of a spiritual warrior are not the usual ones made of stone, wood, metal or gunpowder. They flex the muscles of their mind with the inner powers—the power to face, to adjust, to discern, to withdraw, to cooperate, to let go and move on when necessary. They also ensure they are full of inner beauty: lightness, kindness, generosity, humility, benevolence, compassion, beauty and more. And most of all, they always carry with them the ‘weapons’ of love, peace, truth, bliss and purity. Of course, these tools need sharpening from time to time through meditation.

Spiritual warriors are known to go through “spiritual deaths”. One such death is ego, another is attachment. Learning to “die” is a ‘give in’ on the spiritual journey, in fact it is when we have truly died, that we can really awaken and live. Therefore, the battle is not with the enemy out there, but with the one within. Once I have “killed” or for sake of semantics, transformed myself, metamorphosed myself, then there is no battle left to fight. For example, if you don’t have an ego, no one can dent or crush your ego. If there is no attachment, no one can give you pain! This is illustrated well in the Bhagavad Gita. The whole Gita is a dialogue between Lord Krishna and Arjuna, the greatest archer ever.

After having conquered our attachment to people, money and possessions, food and taste buds, clothes and comforts, our final battle will be with our attachment and identification with our body.

They are standing in the middle of a huge battlefield and Arjuna, having won the first choice, chooses to have Lord Krishna by his side and his rival cousin Duroydhana, has accepted what would have been his first choice anyway, the whole army. Arjuna, seeing that his enemies are his relatives and loved ones, becomes weakened and refuses to fight. It is then that Lord Krishna begins by giving him knowledge and inspiration of various kinds. One of the last significant statements is when Lord Krishna explains, “Whether you kill them in your mind or on the battlefield, it is the same thing.” Lord Krishna was urging him to fight, not the violent battle, but the internal one of the web of attachment. Some attachments can be so severe; they take on the form of a ‘vein’.

The vein channels the blood, the life force, from one organ to another. In the same manner, the ‘blood of attachment’ affects all those to whom you are attached. If something happens to you, it is as though it is happening to them, such is the influence of the attachment. Arjuna was a spiritual warrior. The very meaning of his name is the one who cannot be defeated. We are all being called on to be Arjuna, the spiritual warriors who are not defeated by life’s trivial games.

After having conquered our attachment to people, money and possessions, food and taste buds, clothes and comforts, our final battle will be with our attachment and identification with our body. The ‘departure’ needs to be so smooth and natural, as familiar as a mini-meditation. The feeling is of moving from one floor to another—from this worldly plane to another. No tug of war, no pull of the body, people or comforts and absolutely no pain—the soul simply flies on. Meditation is, in fact, like a mini death. We learn to separate from the consciousness of this body and fly beyond to our home of light. The more we practice this, the more in fact, our “battles” will reduce! Its time… to look within and seek out the enemy.

The spiritual warrior blames nobody, and takes full responsibility for the self and the battlefield he has found himself in. Cut those veins of attachment that drain so much energy from the soul, kill the ego, become light and most of all learn to smile because you are that Arjuna and your victory is guaranteed!

By Aruna Ladva

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