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Motherhood: There’s no one way to it

You’d never know how it feels to be a mother until the day you become one. Try as you might, you cannot truly prepare yourself for it. The nine whole months of expectation, anticipation, and anxiousness transform into a stream of joy the moment you hold your little one in your arms. The sudden sense of purpose you feel outweighs everything else in your life. Nothing matters more than your child.

Yet all the beauty that defines motherhood cannot mask the challenges it brings with it. It could take you a while to understand the overwhelming affection and sense of responsibility towards your child. But in time, you’ll grow into your new role, and above all, grow as a mother, along with your child.

This Mother’s Day, Soulveda speaks to women from various spheres of life to understand what motherhood means to them, the challenges it brings, and the bond they share with their children.

  • Malavika Avinash, actor & politician

    I hadn't planned on being a mother, especially at the peak of my acting career. I was very worried that I won't be able to give time to a child. But maybe I was always destined to be a mother because when I found out I was pregnant, I suddenly felt I could do it. Today, my fear of not giving my child enough time still hasn't changed. My son is nine now and has special needs. So, being a mother to him has been a learning process for me.
  • Reeth Abraham, athlete

    I have a son and a daughter. Both are grown-ups now but when I was raising them, I had to be very careful about not treating them differently. I had set reasonable rules for both of them just the same. My daughter followed through, but my son rebelled at every step, especially when they were teenagers. So, there was really no way of saying if my parenting experience would go as planned. But once they grew up, I could see that I did just fine.
  • Sujata Iyer, artiste

    As a 15-year-old, I couldn't wait to be a mother. I grew up in a crèche as my parents were working. So, I always dreamed of being a more involved parent. Today, my son is 17 and it has been an incredible journey. So much so that with the experience of raising him, I have started my own venture to help mothers bond with their children better. I don't believe I have the right to dump my expectations on my child. I have never been harsh to him. I believe in letting him be his own person. I let him make mistakes, learn and find his own way in the world.
  • Harshikaa Udasi, writer of children’s books

    My son and I share an honest friendship that began when he was a baby. I would tell him about my day and he would gurgle in response. To this day, we're that close. My son knows he can come to me and ask me any question upfront and I will give him a satisfactory answer. I would like to think this has created a safe environment for him to share his thoughts and ask any 'awkward' questions. And if I have a problem in my life and I think he can help me, I pour my heart out to him. I haven't created any no-entry zones and I think that's the best way to be.
  • Shwetha Srivatsav, actor

    Motherhood is an overwhelming and a wonderful feeling. To explain the love, especially between a mother and child is difficult. You should experience to understand it. I am already feeling the selflessness, and the sacrifices of my body and mind. Motherhood is truly priceless and comes with great responsibility. My daughter is an obedient baby. She understands me and I understand her well. When she grows up, and is able to understand the world, I would like to be a parent who would share a friendly quotient with her child.
  • Divya Chauhan, wedding planner

    Motherhood to me is a wonderful feeling of having someone who is an extension of you and better than you. It is a selfless relationship where you are more concerned about the other person's happiness. It changes the emotional aspect of your being. I treat my children as individuals who have their own personality. It is not about teaching them, but it is more about guiding them through the good and the bad. Sometimes, I learn from them. Other times, I correct myself, because once you become a parent, you lead by example.

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