Living like there is no Tomorrow

There is no tomorrow

11 months later, no one was shaking a leg anymore. Things had quietened down. One day, John was working when his father’s photo on the table stole his attention.
By

The music was loud and the lights were dim. George was dancing like there was no tomorrow. Wearing a long smile on his face, he was moving his hips slowly and carefully. He didn’t want to aggravate his back pain. For a 70-year-old, however, he was dancing just fine.

George’s wife was there too, along with their son, daughter-in-law, and their precious little 6-year-old grand-daughter. Everyone was doing their best to match George’s energy levels, spinning and twirling to the rhythms of pop music. Especially the little one. She didn’t care about what was happening around her. After all, the music was on and the dance floor was buzzing with tapping feet.

“George, let’s call it a day,” his wife, Sarah said. “You are not 20 anymore, and you need rest.”

“Yes dad, you should rest,” John said concernedly.

“I have told you guys already, If I am going to die, I’d die doing things I love, like dancing and travelling. I want to live every moment while I can,” George said smilingly, looking at both, his wife and son.

“Oh, George!” Sarah let out a soft moan and began to cry. Suddenly, the joyous atmosphere in the room transformed into sorrow. It was time to face the reality.

“The doctors gave me two months to live. But for me, they are 60 days. I want to cherish them all with my family,” George muttered while looking at the floor, trying to conceal his emotions.

“Grandpa, can we dance more?” the little girl asked innocently. “Of course, my sweetheart!” George replied and got lost in dancing again.

11 months later, no one was shaking a leg anymore. Things had quietened down. One day, John was working when his father’s photo on the table stole his attention. He held it in his hands and wondered how lucky he was. He wished he could talk to his father but he knew he couldn’t.

The phone rang. It was his mother.

“Mom, where are you? What time will you be back?” John asked.

“Why do you sound low? Is everything okay?” Sarah noticed weariness in her son’s voice.

“Nothing, I am just missing dad,” said John.

“Hello, can you hear me, mom?” The network was bad.

The next moment, there was a knock on the door.

“You are here already? How was Indonesia?” said John as he opened the door.

“It was great. But not as great as coming back home. We missed you all,” George replied with a wide smile on his face.

It was George’s second trip in the last four months. After proving the doctors wrong and still living like there’s no tomorrow, he had found happiness on the edge of life.

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER

Name

Email

INTERESTED IN
Happiness
Wellbeing
Conversations
Travel Diaries
Guest Contributors
Spiritual Leaders
Thought Leaders
Books
Short Stories
Love
Relationships
Family
Motivation
Life Lessons