Fall down seven times, get up eight

Fall down seven times, get up eight

Aarav wondered whether he will ever be able to achieve the same success that his parents so effortlessly seemed to have.
By

“That’s it. I am done,” Aarav threw down his books as he looked at his phone with dampened eyes. He fell short despite his second attempt at the entrance exam. He cursed his luck and locked himself up in his room.

He wondered whether he will ever be able to achieve the same success as that parents so effortlessly seemed to have. The thought of others’ expectations was weighing him down.

I am a failure. What will I say to mom and dad? God, what will happen to my future? Aarav felt like his brain would explode until he heard a knock on the door.

It was his mother, Tara.

“Leave me alone, ma. I am a failure. I’ve let you down once again,” Aarav cried.

“Don’t say that. This is just a bump in the road. You can try again,” Tara tried to pacify him.

Aarav was having none of it. “Easy for you to say. You and dad… you have everything. You are successful, famous, everyone respects you.”

“Okay, you could say that. But it didn’t happen overnight. Your father and I had our fair share of failure, dejection, disappointment,” Tara began to reminisce. “I still remember the day when your father was fired from his job.”

“Dad was fired?” Aarav interrupted.

“It was a long time ago, son. He made the mistake of taking more than he could handle, and the pressure eventually got to him. He started making errors, missing the deadlines, and one day, he was let go. But he didn’t give up. He learned from his mistakes and found another job. He overcame one obstacle after another and became the person he is today,” she said as she leaned against the shut door.

“I never thought dad could make a mistake!” he mumbled.

“No one is perfect, Aarav. Now, open the door. I can’t stand here any longer,” Tara said with a grin.

Aarav got up from the bed, opened the door and hugged his mother. The warm hug reminded Tara of her four-year-old Aarav. “Just promise me, you’ll stop judging yourself so harshly. If you ever lock yourself up again, you’ll be dealing with your father,” she smacked him gently on his head.

“Thank you, ma,” Aarav smiled through his tears.

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